The concept of “community” resonates powerfully at the University of Maine School of Law, both in terms of the relationships that are built here, and in the way we engage with our city, our state, and the world beyond.

Community of scholars

Maine Law is a small law school. One of the smallest in the nation, in fact. This fosters a close-knit environment that is embraced by students, alumni and faculty. While there is plenty of healthy competition, students at Maine Law support one another and collaborate on a daily basis. You will have the opportunity to develop close friendships and professional connections that will last for the rest of your life.

Community engagement

Civic engagement and public service have been at the core of a Maine Law education since Dean Godfrey and his colleagues first opened the doors in 1962. We believe it is our duty to give back to our communities and to help keep the doors of justice open for all.

Our students are encouraged to make a positive impact from the first semester all the way through commencement. Students make a difference in these and other courses and programs:

  • Clinical courses combine intensive instruction, mentoring and live-client representation. Student attorneys represent poor, elderly and juvenile clients in real cases, within four distinct legal aid clinics.
  • The Pro Bono Program encourages students to provide a minimum of 80 hours of pro bono legal service, without financial compensation or academic credit, before graduation. Collectively, the class of 2016 contributed more than 7,330 pro bono hours during their three years at Maine Law.
  • Summer Fellowships. In recent years, Maine Law students have secured public interest fellowships, working for organizations in Alaska, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, and Botswana.

This commitment to service carries over into career paths, both in the private and public sectors. The Maine Bar, which is heavily populated with our graduates, contributes a significantly higher number of pro bono hours annually, when compared against lawyers from other states. Our alumni include numerous past and present leaders within the state Legislature, former governors and attorneys general, the current U.S. Attorney for the District of Maine, and many judges of the Maine District, Superior and Supreme Judicial Courts, including current Chief Justice Leigh Ingalls Saufley ’80.