Professor Lupica named Fulbright Senior Scholar

Professor Lupica named Fulbright Senior Scholar

Professor Lois Lupica has been awarded a Fulbright Senior Scholar Award to study in Australia in 2019. This prestigious award from the Australian Fulbright Commission will allow Lupica to conduct her research, guest lecture, and mentor students at the top ranked Australian law school – the University of Melbourne Law School. While in Australia, Lupica will work with scholars, government funded agencies, and NGOs to study how Australia is addressing its access to civil justice crisis.

Professor Lupica is the Maine Law Foundation Professor of Law at the University of Maine School of Law. A nationally recognized scholar in the areas of access to justice, consumer and commercial credit, and bankruptcy law, she is the author of over 30 articles and books. Her empirical research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the American Bankruptcy Institute Anthony H.N. Schnelling Endowment, the National Conference of Bankruptcy Judges Endowment for Education, the Sears Consumer Protection and Education Fund, the Maine Economic Improvement Fund, Harvard University, and the Arnold Foundation.

The Fulbright program was launched in 1946 and is overseen by the United States Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Distinguished Fulbright alumni include heads of state, judges, ambassadors, cabinet ministers, CEOs, university presidents, leading journalists, artists, scientists, and professors and includes 58 Nobel Laureates, 82 Pulitzer Prize winners, 31 MacArthur Fellows, and 16 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipients.

Professor Lupica will use her Fulbright award to critically examine the Australian legal services’ structure, priorities, and methods of service delivery. She will study the effectiveness of recently implemented programmatic innovations, including technology-based innovations. She will also identify best practices for advancing the cause of access to justice in order to develop the tools to replicate and scale these practices in the U.S.