Judge John Woodcock, Jr. to present keynote address at Maine Law Commencement

Hon. John WoodcockThe Hon. John Woodcock, Jr., Senior United States District Judge for the District of Maine, will be the keynote speaker at this year’s commencement for the University of Maine School of Law on May 26.

A Bangor native, Judge Woodcock received his bachelor’s degree from Bowdoin College in 1972, his master’s degree from the London School of Economics in 1973, and his law degree from the University of Maine School of Law in 1976. After graduating from Maine Law, he returned to Bangor, where he served in the District Attorney’s Office.

Prior to his appointment to the federal bench, Judge Woodcock was in private practice in Bangor for over two decades, playing an active role in improving the standards of the legal profession through serving on the Maine Supreme Judicial Court’s Advisory Committee on Professional Responsibility. His commitment to public service extends beyond the bench and bar. He supports a wide range of institutions, including the boards of Bowdoin College, Eastern Maine Healthcare, Eastern Maine Medical Center, Eastern Maine Charities, the Maine State Commission on Arts and Humanities, the Good Samaritan Agency, the Bangor Children’s Home, and others. He is also an active and long-standing member of the Maine Law Board of Visitors.

Judge Woodcock was nominated on March 27, 2003 to the United States District Court by President George W. Bush and was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on June 12, 2003. He served not only as Chief Judge for the District of Maine from 2009 to 2015, but was also part of three Judicial Conference Committees: the Committee on Defender Services, the Budget Committee, and the Advisory Committee on the Rules of Evidence.

The graduation ceremony will be held at 10:00 am on Saturday, May 26, at Merrill Auditorium in Portland. Maine Law will award seventy-five J.D. degrees, one LL.M. degree, and one J.S.D. degree. Family and friends are welcome to attend the ceremony, and tickets are not required.