Alison Rieser

Alison Rieser, a nationally recognized expert in ocean and coastal law, is an Emerita Professor at Maine Law. She is the Dai Ho Chun Distinguished Chair at the University of Hawaii, with a joint appointment in the departments of economics and geography.

In the fall of 2013, Professor Rieser launched an online course at Maine Law, titled Marine Resources, which is also offered to graduate students in marine science and policy at the University of Maine in Orono. The course is based on Professor Rieser’s book, Ocean and Coastal Law, which is the leading casebook in the field.

Before joining the Maine Law School faculty, Professor Rieser spent two years as a post-doctoral fellow in marine policy and ocean management at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From 1983 until 2001, Professor Rieser was Director of Maine Law’s Marine Law Institute, which is now the Center for Oceans and Coastal Law. She was the founding faculty advisor to the Ocean and Coastal Law Journal. In 1999, Professor Rieser became the only law professor to be named a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation.

Professor Rieser’s research interests include the use of property and rights-based concepts in ocean and coastal management, ecosystem approaches to the governance of marine fisheries, and the role of science in national and international marine legal regimes. She is a consultant to state and federal agencies and NGOs and an active participant in national and international discussions of marine policy. Her latest book, published in 2012 by Johns Hopkins University Press, is The Case of the Green Turtle: An Uncensored History of a Conservation Icon.

Selected Publications

THE CASE OF THE GREEN TURTLE: AN UNCENSORED HISTORY OF A CONSERVATION ICON (John Hopkins Univ. Press 2012).

Whales, Whaling and the Warming Oceans, 36 B.C. ENVTL. AFF. L. REV. 401 (2009). [PDF]
reprinted in CLIMATE CHANGE: A READER (W.H. Rodgers, Jr. et al., eds., Carolina Acad. Press 2011). [CAP]

Saving Salmo: Federalism and the Conservation of Maine’s Atlantic Salmon, 16 OCEAN & COASTAL L.J. 135, reprinted in THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT AND FEDERALISM: EFFECTIVE CONSERVATION THROUGH GREATER STATE COMMITMENT (Kaush Arha & Barton H. Thompson Jr. eds., RFF Press 2011). [PDF]

AN AGGRESSIVE STEWARDSHIP OF RELICS: A HISTORY OF THE GREEN TURTLE AS AN ENDANGERED SPECIES (Johns Hopkins Univ. Press 2011).

Additional Publications

COASTAL AND OCEANS LAW: CASES AND MATERIALS (3d ed. 2006; 4th ed. 2013) (co-authored with Kalo, J.J., R.G. Hildreth, & D.R. Christie; lead author of Chapter 7 (Fisheries and Marine Ecosystems) and Chapter 8 (Marine Mammals and Endangered Marine Wildlife) and corresponding chapters in Teachers’ Manual).

The Role of Legal Regimes in Marine Conservation Biology, in MARINE CONSERVATION BIOLOGY: THE SCIENCE OF MAINTAINING THE SEA’S BIODIVERSITY (E.A. Norse and L. Crowder eds., Island Press 2005) (co-authored with C.G. Hudson & S. Roady). [PDF]

TACKLING MARINE DEBRIS IN THE 21ST CENTURY (2009) (co-authored with the Committee on the Effectiveness of International and National Measures to Prevent and Reduce Marine Debris and its Impacts, National Academy of Sciences).

Oysters, Ecosystems, and Persuasion, 18 YALE J.L. & HUMAN. 49 (2006) (invited contribution to a special issue celebrating the property law scholarship of Prof. Carol Rose upon her retirement from Yale Law School). [PDF]

International Fisheries Law, Overfishing and Marine Biodiversity, 9 GEO. INT’L ENVTL. L. REV. 251 (1997). [PDF]

Prescriptions for the Commons: Environmental Scholarship and the Fishing Quotas Debate, 23 HARV. ENVTL. L. REV. 393 (1999) reprinted in INTERNATIONAL LIBRARY OF ESSAYS IN LAW AND LEGAL THEORY: SECOND SERIES (Peter S. Menell ed., 2002). [PDF]